The Lies of Locke Lamore, read-along, week 4

So, we’re into week 4 and there is only one week left and I admit, I read the book last weekend. 🙂 I just couldn’t stop.

This week’s questions are provided by Ashley of SF Signal and here they are with my answers:

1.      In the chapter “A Curious Tale for Countess Amberglass” we learn of the tradition of the night tea in Camorr. I found that not so much fantastical as realistic – how about you?

I found it intriguing as it made me realize the women are very important to the smooth running of Camorr. Hm! That does make it realistic quite a lot. 🙂

2.      When Jean meets with what will become the Wicked Sisters for the first time, the meeting is described very much like how people feel when they find their true work or home. Agree? Disagree? Some of both?

True work? True love? It does seem like he’s found himself. I am enjoying his character immensely, especially since he’s the one you are most likely to overlook (along with the rather small and thin Locke), and of the most deadly opponents to face.

3.      Salt devils. Bug. Jean. The description is intense. Do you find that description a help in visualizing the scene? Do you find yourself wishing the description was occasionally – well – a little less descriptive?

Oh, yes, it certainly helps with visualization. And keeping one at the edge of the seat (or wherever you’re reading).
And I did wish there were some less descriptive parts as I really felt awful seeing them in my head. Which brings me to the obvious conclusion they were extremely well done.

4.      This section has so much action in it, it’s hard to find a place to pause. But…but.. oh, Locke. Oh, Jean. On their return to the House of Perelandro, their world is turned upside down. Did you see it coming?

Oh no, I did not! As a matter of fact, the end of the previous section had me read further to see what happens and I read to just somewhere about here. Which is why I was so UPSET last week with Mr. Lynch.
I learned to live with it, as someone last week mentioned Jean makes it into book 2, so that made me feel a bit better.

5.      Tavrin Callas’s service to the House of Aza Guilla is recalled at an opportune moment, and may have something to do with saving a life or three. Do you believe Chains knew what he set in motion? Why or why not?

Good question. I wish I knew more about Chains to answer it. 🙂 I think we are going to learn more about Chains and his motives (I sincerely hope so) as that seems to be the way the books are written – you learn everything at the right moment.
I see this more as good thinking on Mr. Lynch’s part. 😉
And it obviously fits Jean.

6.      As Locke and Jean prepare for Capa Raza, Dona Vorchenza’s remark that the Thorn of Camorr has never been violent – only greedy and resorting to trickery – comes to mind again. Will this pattern continue?

I do believe Dona Vorchenza was correct and when I read that, I instantly had a high opionion of her. But honestly, after someone murders what is obviously your family even if you’re not blood related, I would never expect Locke to remain non-violent. I’m sure in any other scenario, he would be because his intelligence is best displayed in complicated schemes.

7.      Does Locke Lamora or the Thorn of Camorr enter Meraggio’s Countinghouse that day? Is there a difference?

I’d say Locke Lamora tries to enter twice but then it’s the Thorn who actually manages to make things possible. Or, more precisely, at the point when Locke has the plan in his head, the one that sounds more like a true Thorn plan, that is when it works.

And our hosts for the read-along are:

The Little Red Reviewer

My Awful Reviews

Dark Cargo

SF Signal

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7 thoughts on “The Lies of Locke Lamore, read-along, week 4

  1. Lynn March 31, 2012 at 23:00 Reply

    I love the way that Lynch writes such great female roles. Here we have the countess having her little tea soiree – but really she's sat in the very centre of all the intrigue and is playing a major role.Sorry – the spoiler last week was totally my fault – *hangs head in shame* it was very unintentional but unfortunately once its out there…. Oh well, I did go back and delete it – but much badness on my part! Need to take more care, it's just too easy to slip up!Lynn 😀

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  2. Sue CCCP April 1, 2012 at 04:23 Reply

    I'm glad to have the reassurance that Jean will survive: Hurrah!You are right about Mr Lynch's females being strong: even Sabetha, and we've never met her! 😀

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  3. Ines April 1, 2012 at 17:25 Reply

    Oh no, Lynn, you made my life so much easier. 🙂 I was so scared Jean might be killed too.It's true, once you read the book, it's very easy writing a spoiler without even realizing it.I had to consider my answers carefully as I almost said some things I shouldn't. 🙂

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  4. Ines April 1, 2012 at 17:26 Reply

    Good point Sue about Sabetha. We haven't evem met her and she already seems like a strong, independent character. 🙂 I can't wait to meet her for real (in the book of course). 😉

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  5. redhead April 1, 2012 at 18:23 Reply

    Dona Vorchenza and Dona Salvara are about to become even more important. 😀 it's something that always cracks me up about this book. We start out, and it's such a "boy book", with very few women. . . and then, well, and then the end happens, and some of the fellows really start to feel like pawns. nice!! that scene with Bug always makes me cry. always. damn it Lynch, when will I learn to read your stuff in the privacy of my own home isntead of over a sandwich at a cafe? you are almost as bad as Doctorow!

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  6. Ines April 2, 2012 at 16:24 Reply

    Thank you for saying that (about Donas). 🙂 I am very much looking forward to reading more about them. When does the book 2 read-along start?

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  7. […] 8. Scott Lynch: The Lies of Locke Lamora […]

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