The Lies of Locke Lamora read-along, week 3

It’s time for the third part of the read-along and this time the questions were provided by Bryce of My Awful Reviews.
So, without further ado, my answers and some venting of frustration regarding Mr. Lynch and his treatment of characters.

1. This section is where we finally get to sneak a peek at the magic in The Gentleman Bastards books. From what we read, what are your initial impressions of the magic Lynch is using? Is there any way that Locke and Company would be able to get around the Bondsmage’s powers?

I sincerely hope so (about Locke and company getting around it). I hate it when people are full of themselves in real life so that one particularly got on my nerves (the Falconer). Although it doesn’t hurt Locke to understand sometimes he might not be the top intelligence in something.

2. Not a question, but an area for rampant speculation: If you want to take a stab at who you think the Grey King might be, feel free to do it here.

Can’t answer this one as I got a bit further so I know, but any guess of mine wouldn’t have come close. Although, I’m still wondering what’s the reason behind it all?

2.5 (since 2 wasn’t really a question) Anyone see the Nazca thing coming? Anyone? Do you think there are more crazy turns like this in store for the book? Would you like to speculate about them here? (yes, yes you would)
Ok, first off, it wasn’t fair in the week 2 to point us in the wrong direction speculating about possible Nazca/Locke future. πŸ™‚ And no, I didn’t see that coming. Especially after that question in week 2.

I wasn’t really contemplating possible future shocks but in retrospect I should have. I am SERIOUSLY UPSET with Mr. Lynch for what comes up in the read-along in the week 4. I sincerely hope he makes it up to both characters and readers in some way (and if you know, feel free to ease my mind with hinting at that).

3. When Locke says “Nice bird, arsehole,” I lose it. EVERY TIME. And not just because I have the UK version of the book and the word arsehole is funnier than asshole. Have there been any other places in the books so far where you found yourself laughing out loud, or giggling like a crazy person on the subway?

Oh yes, chuckling for me is part of the book, as well as the shocks. At the moment, I can’t come up with the chuckles part (as I’m still upset with Mr. Lynch). πŸ™‚

4. By the end of this reading section, have your opinions changed about how clever the Bastards are? Do you still feel like they’re “cleverer than all the rest?” Or have they been decidedly outplayed by the Grey King and his Bondsmage?
Oh, they’ve been outplayed. But, as they are all still young, I’m hoping it’s Mr. Lynch’s way of making them learn they are never the smartest thing around and should stop thinking of themselves in such a manner.
Unfortunately, I cannot answer the questions as I would have if I had stopped reading where the read-along stopped for this week.
I mean honestly, did anyone stop who’s first reading this is?

5. I imagine that you’ve probably read ahead, since this was a huge cliffhanger of an ending for the “present” storyline, but I’ll ask this anyway: Where do you see the story going from here, now that the Grey King is thought to be dead?

I now see my point from question 4 is addressed. πŸ™‚ (I didn’t read all the questions ahead before starting to answer them)
Point for Locke for guessing it correctly. I was a bit shocked about the whole drowning thing to be able to coherently think ahead.

6. What do you think of the characters Scott Lynch has given us so far? Are they believable? Real? Fleshed out? If not, what are they lacking?

I find the characters believable enough. What I still struggle with is understanding Locke.

7. Now that you’ve seen how clever Chains is about his “apprenticeships,” why do you think he’s doing all of this? Does he have an endgame in sight? Is there a goal he wants them to achieve, or is it something more emotional like revenge?

Hmm, I have no guesses to offer why Chains might be doing this, and I wouldn’t say revenge is the deal, unless the revenge is againt the state of affairs (ruling families).
This book just opens more and more questions without giving us answers.

The read-along is hosted by these blogs so hop on over and check them out:
The Little Red Reviewer
My Awful Reviews

Dark Cargo

P.S. I’m still upset with Mr. Lynch.

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16 thoughts on “The Lies of Locke Lamora read-along, week 3

  1. Lynn March 24, 2012 at 16:13 Reply

    Tee hee! Are you upset with Mr Lynch at all! LOLI know what you mean, I really liked Nazca – but you have to hand it to Mr L – he's got us all on our toes now – nobody is safe and there's no guarantee of a happy ending. Lynn πŸ˜€

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  2. Ines March 24, 2012 at 18:24 Reply

    Lynn, does it really show I'm upset? ;)Honestly (and unfortunately), as far as I got reading, that really is true.

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  3. RealBooks4ever March 24, 2012 at 19:32 Reply

    The Nazca episode shocked me into a deeper emotional investment in the lives of our "heroes".

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  4. Jeremy March 24, 2012 at 20:16 Reply

    I feel your pain about Nazca (and I agree last week's questions seem intentionally misleading). What was even more shocking to me though was Locke's response. I know Lynch has been making it clear over and over that Locke doesn't really care about people other than how he can use them, but I guess some part of me thought he really cared about Nazca. I think I forgot the extent of their scheme ripping off her family. So when he returned to the Gentleman Bastards and didn't seem much more than perturbed, it finally sunk in how much of Locke's life is just a show. Yipes!Also, I still think they are the smartest and best. Even championship teams lose a game now and then… but they're still the best.

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  5. nrlymrtl March 24, 2012 at 23:01 Reply

    Heya all – last week's Q wasn't meant to intentionally mislead you. I truly did find her cool, especially her shoes. I was shocked when she exited the story in such a disgusting way. For me, it makes the story more real – if the author is willing to invest his time in developing a character to that point and then take them out, well, anyone could be cut by the end of the trilogy, right?

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  6. Ines March 25, 2012 at 11:11 Reply

    Interesting point – now that you mentioned it, I believe it did the same for me.

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  7. Ines March 25, 2012 at 11:13 Reply

    Hmm, I didn't quite read it like that. It seemed more to me Locke purposefully decided to not feel anything and hid his pain inside himself, in order to deal with it once the situation was easier.But then again, it might be my romantic side reading more into his actions (even though Nazca is only a friend).

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  8. Ines March 25, 2012 at 11:17 Reply

    nrlymrtl, I thought it was quite ingenious on your part to ask such a question. πŸ™‚ I was even waiting while reading the book to see if there will be some kind of miracle where she comes alive (considering your question). :)But yes, you're quite right about the author investing time into characters to make everything more real (which is why I'm still upset with Mr. Lynch). :)The book wouldn't be as gripping if it weren't for all the elements working so well together (the shocking and the chuckling).

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  9. redhead March 26, 2012 at 03:24 Reply

    Didn't Chains spend nearly Locke's entire childhood trying to tell him that he's not as smart as he thinks he is? Looks like Locke is only now understanding how true that is. And nothing builds character like getting crap kicked out of you by someone who knows your every move. Poor Locke & gang. I suddenly feel really bad for them. This book is such an emotional roller coaster! We have hilarious lines like "I'm in need of Camorr's ugliest seamstress", and other hysterical banter. . . and then 3 pages later that thing with Nacza. You go from laughing your ass off to being nearly in tears. and that's how you know it's the good stuff.

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  10. Lily Froggy March 26, 2012 at 12:13 Reply

    I'm also rooting for the emotional rollercoaster, one minute you're laughing your ass off, then someone's dead. Damn you mr Lynch!! I was also a bit upset with him (not sure your feeling will improve with the rest of the book…) but he makes it so good that I can't stay mad too long.

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  11. Ines March 26, 2012 at 12:28 Reply

    I hope this time around Locke learns it (although I'm a bit doubtful about that). :)Oh, the rollercoaster is a true image of this book. I had to read it through, could not stop after the events from part 3, and I was very surprised at some of my feelings and thoughts on the way.I am now very much looking forward to the next batch of questions. πŸ™‚

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  12. Ines March 26, 2012 at 12:30 Reply

    He, he, Lily Froggy, I read to the end and along the way stopped being upset. πŸ™‚ It's so true about laughing one minute and the next someone's dead. Keeps us on our toes. πŸ˜‰

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  13. Allie March 26, 2012 at 13:18 Reply

    I'm a first-time reader, and I actually did stop reading with Locke drowning in urine. I'll probably resume this evening– your anger is making me frightened about what might happen next!

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  14. Ines March 26, 2012 at 13:32 Reply

    I'm amazed at some of you who managed to stop reading. πŸ™‚ I really couldn't.I'm wondering what you'll say in the next round of the read-along, once you're through with that part of the book.I finished the whole book yesterday evening because I got pulled into the story and just couldn't stop anymore. πŸ™‚ And I'm no longer upset.

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  15. Sue CCCP March 27, 2012 at 00:31 Reply

    I'm also a first time reader and I still haven't gone past the stop point for last week. This is unusual for me, because I normally get addicted to a book and can't put it down. I am really enjoying this book (I've recommended it to my book group), but prolonging the enjoyment because of the Read Along is only adding to the experience, rather like waiting for the next episode of a wonderful TV show. πŸ™‚

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  16. Ines March 27, 2012 at 13:51 Reply

    Sue, I'm recommending this book to everyone I know who enjoys reading. It really is great. :)I was thinking about the prolonged enjoyment but I'm not known for my patience, so now I'm at ease and are no longer worried what might come next. πŸ™‚

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